2019 Celebration of Teaching and Learning Symposium

The Office of the Provost welcomed the Columbia community to Low Library for the Celebration of Teaching and Learning Symposium on Tuesday, March 12th, 2019 to celebrate the ways that faculty and graduate students are transforming their courses and pedagogies. The event featured keynote speaker Carl Wieman, Nobel Laureate and Professor of Physics and Education at Stanford University. Wieman’s keynote presentation focused on taking a scientific approach to teaching. The keynote was followed by an interactive showcase in the Rotunda featuring presentations by faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students. After an announcement of the inaugural cohort of the Provost’s Senior Faculty Teaching Scholars, participants were invited to join a reception in Faculty Room.

Read below to learn more about the Symposium and view videos and photos from the event!

Keynote Speaker, Carl Wieman

Carl Wieman has pioneered the use of experimental techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of various teaching strategies for physics and other sciences, and recently served as Associate Director for Science in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. In his keynote presentation, Wieman focused on taking a scientific approach to science (and most everything else) education.

Interactive Showcase of Teaching Innovations

Faculty and graduate students hosted an interactive showcase to present their projects on enhancing the learning experience.

Adaptive e-Learning in Economics
Thomas Groll, School of International and Public Affairs
Hybrid Learning Course Redesign and Delivery Grant Awardee

Assessment to Document Student Learning in Frontiers of Science
Ivana Hughes, Adam Brown, Frontiers of Science
Large Scale Teaching and Learning Grant Awardee

Beyond the Textbook: A Hybrid Redesign for Spanish Intermediate II
Angelina Craig-Florez, Latin American and Iberian Cultures
Hybrid Learning Course Redesign and Delivery Grant Awardee

Developing Client-Centered and Function-based Outcome Measures through a Hybrid Doctoral Course on Measurement and Instrumentation
Lenin C. Grajo, Occupational Therapy, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
Hybrid Learning Course Redesign and Delivery Grant Awardee

Developing Students’ Clinical Reasoning through a Hybrid Doctoral Course with Low-Cost Patient Simulations
Wing Fu, Physical Therapy, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
Hybrid Learning Course Redesign and Delivery Grant Awardee

Evaluation and Assessment Tools for a Course-based Crowdsourcing Activity
Dan Esposito, Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Start Small! Mini Grant Awardee

Find the Words: Helping Students Develop Better Clinical Skills
Katherine Shear, Matthea Marquart, Kristin Garay, School of Social Work
Hybrid Learning Course Redesign and Delivery Grant Awardee

Graduate Student Teaching Innovations
Allison Bernard, EALAC; Joss Greene, Sociology; Catherine Hoar, Earth & Environmental Engineering; Adrianna Munson, Sociology; Tomer Yavetz, Astronomy
CTL Graduate Student Fellows and Consultants

How Do Columbia Students Learn Best?
Melissa A. Wright & Amanda M. Jungels, Center for Teaching and Learning

Implementation of Mind and Brain Case-Based Learning Experience in Frontiers of Science
Logan D. Brenner, Ellen J. Crapster-Pregont, Frontiers of Science
Start Small! Mini Grant Awardees

MOOCs: Columbia’s Courses Reach Beyond the Campus
Alice Kessler-Harris (History), Daniel Wolfenzon (Business), Michael Cennamo (CVTI) with Maurice Matiz, Kerri O’Connell, Andrew Flatgard, Center for Teaching and Learning
Massive Open Online Courses Grant Projects

Reading the Lifelines: Professional Identity Emergence Made Legible
Delphine Taylor, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Redesigning an Interdisciplinary Food Course from a Systems Thinking Perspective
Eleanor Sterling, Sharon Akabas, Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology
Hybrid Learning Course Redesign and Delivery Grant Awardees

Team-Based Learning with Virtual and Manikin Simulation
Kathleen Mullen, School of Nursing
Hybrid Learning Course Redesign and Delivery Grant Awardee

Thinking Communally: A Creative Final Project Based on the Use of L2 as a Critical Tool
Marta Ferrer, Almudena Marín-Cobos, Latin American and Iberian Cultures
CTL Graduate Student Fellows

Announcement of Senior Faculty Teaching Scholars

The inaugural cohort of Provost’s Senior Faculty Teaching scholars was announced at the annual Celebration of Teaching and Learning Symposium.

What is the Provost’s Senior Faculty Teaching Scholars program about?

This new program aims to develop a cohort of senior faculty who will each have the opportunity to create a vision and plan for supporting, changing and innovating the culture of teaching and learning within their own department or school, and across campus.

How will it work?

In partnership with the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL), the Provost’s Senior Faculty Teaching Scholars may choose from a range of teaching and learning initiatives including: building community among faculty around teaching through outreach, liaising and hosting events in the CTL, planning and facilitating disciplinary conversation(s), workshop(s) and/or panel(s), or proposing a project that has broad and sustainable impact on teaching and learning at Columbia that goes beyond a single course or curriculum.  The CTL will work with each Senior Faculty Teaching Fellow to develop a year-long plan that aligns their work in this program with the needs of the Columbia teaching community.

How are faculty nominated for this program?

Deans nominate senior faculty who are both outstanding teachers and well-respected researchers in their disciplines.

Thank-a-Prof / Thank-a-TA

CTL staff set up a booth outdoor Low Library during the Symposium to spread the word about the Thank-a-Prof / Thank-a-TA initiative, which will run through the Spring 2019 semester. 

The purpose of this initiative is to celebrate impactful teaching and learning at Columbia University, and for professors and TAs to be recognized for their contributions. Students have two options to submit “thank you” notes:

  1. Submit a thank you note online anytime.
  2. Submit a handwritten thank you note, using one of our postcards, by visiting our 212 Butler Library office weekdays (9am – 5pm).

The CTL collects these notes and sends them to the professors or TAs. There is no limit to the number of thank you notes that a student can submit. All submitters have the option to remain anonymous. Students can email questions to the CTL.